LIKERT OR LIKE IT: AN INTRODUCTION TO EFFECTIVE SURVEY DESIGN
Rachel W Thompson,Boston University School of Medicine,Boston,MA; Brian P. Good,University of Utah School of Medicine,,; Molly E. Rideout,Robert Larner, M.D. College of Medicine at the University of Vermont,,; William V. Raszka,Robert Larner, M.D. College of Medicine at the University of Vermont,,

Rationale:

Surveys are indispensable in medical education research. Online survey programs have streamlined the survey process resulting in great potential for capturing a rich data set. However, truly harnessing the power of the survey - obtaining adequate high-quality data that answers the desired question – necessitates an understanding of both the science behind survey design and how to make surveys that are relevant, coherent, and sufficiently succinct to recruit participants.



Objectives:
  1. Review critical elements in survey design
  2. Develop a systematic approach to designing a survey
  3. Identify common pitfalls in survey design and question structure
  4. Describe how to analyze survey data
  5. Discuss strategies to maximize response rate
  6. Develop a short survey that answers a specific research question


Methods and Content:

This highly interactive workshop will utilize active learning principles to reinforce content. Participants will engage in pre-participation reading, and large group, small group, and peer-to-peer discussions. The workshop will focus on (1) utility and application of the survey in medical education research or curriculum design; (2) overview of the survey process (design, content validation, piloting); (3) pitfalls in survey and question design; (4) methods for maximizing response rates; (5) navigating the oversight process including selection of survey tools; and (6) an approach to analysis. Participants will walk through a sequential process for developing a survey. At each stage, best practices will be presented and then participants will practice application of the knowledge and get targeted feedback. This rigorous, sequential approach will result in the development of a brief survey instrument. Participants are encouraged to bring work in progress, to be further developed or refined during the session.

 

FORMAT

DESCRIPTION

TIME (min)

1

Large group:

Introduction and needs assessment

10

2

Large group:

Surveys – Ice breaker

10

3

Large group:

Overview – steps & stages

2

4

Didactic 1:

Developing a question/hypothesis/objective

10

5

Break out 1:

Small Group Application Exercise

20

6

Large group:

Report out

10

7

Didactic 2:

Question formats and pitfalls

15

8

Break out 2:

Small group application/recognition exercise

10

9

Large group:

Report Out

5

10

BREAK

15

11

Didactic 3:

Cognitive Testing/Pilot

15

12

Break out 3:

Skill application and Question Writing

30

13

Large group:

Report Out

10

14

Didactic 4:

Framing the Survey & Response Rate

20

15

Break out 4:

Framing Exercise

10

16

Large group:

Report out

5

17

Didactic 5:

IRB Approval, Simple descriptive statistics

20

18

Large Group:

Barriers

15

19

Large Group:

Wrap up

5

Total Time:

237