WILL THEY BE READY? DESIGNING EFFECTIVE AND ENGAGING PEDIATRIC RESIDENCY PREPARATORY COURSES (BOOT CAMPS) FOR FOURTH YEAR STUDENTS
Molly E Rideout,University of Vermont Children's Hospital,Burlington,VT; Rebekah Burns,Seattle Children's Hospital, University of Washington School of Medicine,,; Erin P. Devon,Children's Hospital of Philadelphia,,; Amanda Hartke,USC School of Medicine, Greenville,,

Rationale:

 As the number of residency preparatory courses increases exponentially nationwide, clerkship and fourth year directors are being faced with expectations to design and implement courses that are competency-driven and effective in providing maximal preparation for students entering pediatric residency. With wide variability in content, duration, and timing of courses as well as institution-specific requirements, designing a residency preparatory course is complex.

 



Objectives:

-Discuss the literature pertaining to the efficacy of residency preparatory courses

-Design representative residency preparatory course schedules aligned with the needs of and resources available at individual institutions

-Design modules to use in residency preparatory courses that address core entrustable professional activities (EPAs)

-Discuss barriers and strategies to successfully implement residency preparatory courses at home institutions



Methods and Content:

 In an open discussion, participants will share experiences with residency preparatory courses in pediatrics at their home institutions. Individually, participants will consider the available resources and limitations at their institutions and design/complete a needs assessment. Facilitators will summarize key publications about residency preparatory courses and discuss implications with the group. Participants will form small groups based on shared institutional needs or resources and brainstorm key elements to include in courses using a previously developed curricular list mapped to ACGME competencies and EPAs as a guide. Participants will then create sample schedules for courses with varying content, timing, or duration, sharing representative samples with the large group. Facilitators will discuss ideas for designing sessions, including simulation, flipped classroom, and other active learning techniques. Participants will work in small groups to design short modules on selected topics using these techniques creating a shared collection of ideas. Participants will discuss barriers to implementation and develop ideas and strategies to implement engaging residency preparatory courses at their home institutions.

 AV Requirements: LCD projector, sound, screen, flipchart

 Time (min)

  Content

5

  Introductions

10

  Individual: Needs assessment of home institution

10

  Background

25

  Small Groups: Create sample schedules

15

  Large Group: Share sample schedules

25

  Small Group: Create modules

15

  Large Group: Share sample modules

15

  Large Group: Discuss barriers and strategies for implementation