Council on Medical Student Education in Pediatrics

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COMSEP Meeting in Ottawa, ON

Poster Presentation:


DOES A PRE-INTERN PEDIATRIC BOOT CAMP INCREASE THE CONFIDENCE AND FUTURE STARTING SKILLS OF MEDICAL STUDENTS ENTERING RESIDENCY?

Authors:
Erin Pete Devon,,Philadelphia,PA,Jeanine . Ronan,Children's Hospital of Philadelphia,Philadelphia,PA,Rebecca . Tenney-Soeiro,Children's Hospital of Philadelphia,Philadelphia,PA,Dawn Young,Children's Hospital of Philadelphia,Philadelphia,PA

Background

Boot camp, “a short, intensive, and rigorous course of training,” has gained interest in medical education as a way to further prepare students as they transition from medical school to residency.  There is little data in the medical literature about a pre-intern boot camp for medical students going into a pediatric-related field.

Objectives

1.  To describe the anxieties surrounding the transition from medical school to residency.

2.  To increase the confidence of fourth year medical students entering residency.

Methods

The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, in conjunction with the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, developed a week-long, elective boot camp for medical students going into pediatrics. Pre and post questionnaires, as well as group interviews, were conducted to evaluate the impact of the week-long curriculum. 

Results

During group interviews, students describe anxieties about “not having a safety net” and excitement to “have more responsibility”, “to have [their] own patients”, and to “be able to write their own orders.”  They hope boot camp will be a “refresher,” and provide “reassurance.”

Using effect size as a means of analysis, there was a medium or large effect size in confidence level before and after boot camp in 17 of 27 questions asked.   Large effect sizes were seen in interacting with other health professionals, defining high value health care, practicing procedures, learning about pain management and dermatologic emergencies, as well as writing a letter of medical necessity and giving feedback.

Conclusions

Anonymous surveys showed the confidence level increased by a medium or large effect size in 63% of the domains.  Small effect size was noted for some of the medical knowledge topics and sessions taught through didactics.  Current investigations will evaluate the impact of the boot camp by surveying attendees 3 months into internship.