Council on Medical Student Education in Pediatrics

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COMSEP Meeting in Ottawa, ON

Poster Presentation:


Clerkship Initiative to Enhance Shared Educational Experience with Community-based Physicians

Authors:
Mayme E. Marshall,Creighton University School of Medicine,Omaha,NE,John . Schmidt,Creighton University School of Medicine,Omaha,NE,Shannon Hardy,Creighton University School of Medicine,Omaha,NE

Background:Community based physicians play an essential role in medical student education. However, pediatric clerkship directors report the highest incidence of difficulty finding educational clinical sites among clerkships (1). Many programs offer faculty appointments, public recognition, educational opportunities/resources, and/or monetary incentives to illicit physician participation (1). Physicians who enjoy teaching often site the opportunity to stay current with medical practice as a positive aspect of teaching (2-5).

Objective: We developed a new initiative to enhance the shared educational value of teaching medical students for ambulatory pediatricians. A survey was conducted to assess the utilization and opinions of this intervention, as well as physician motivations for teaching.

Methods:  The ‘What I Saw in Clinic’ publication is a compilation of case reports written by third year medical students during the outpatient portion of the pediatric clerkship. Students provide a brief summary of a patient encounter and an overview of a related topic such as current diagnostic criteria, treatment modalities, and follow-up considerations. The Clerkship Director, Department Chair, and fourth year student editors review the case discussions for publication. The final publication includes 3-4 cases and a brief Clerkship Director update, and is sent to participating physicians every two months. After 14 issues, physicians (n=37) were asked to anonymously complete a Likert scale survey assessing utilization and opinions of the publication.

Results: Response rate of 54% (n=20.) Preliminary results suggest, 84.7% of physicians agree/strongly agree that they enjoy working with student-doctors. 84.6% Physicians agree/strongly agree that teaching student doctors is an opportunity to stay current. 100% physicians sometimes/always read the publication. 61.6% agree/strongly agree publication provides relevant information in a concise manner, and 61.6% agree/strongly agree it adds value to the shared education experience. However, only 23% of physicians are currently utilizing the publication as an educational tool for student development.

Discussion: The 'What I Saw in Clinic' publication is a valuable tool other clerkships should consider utilizing to increase student publication opportunities, enhance physician-student educational interactions, and concisely provide current recommendations to help physicians stay up to date.

References:

1. Recruiting and Maintaining U.S. Clinical Training Sites: Joint Report of the 2013 Multi-Discipline Clerkship/Clinical Training Site Survey. Association of American Medical Colleges. 2014.

2.  Bowen JL and Irby DM. Assessing Quality and Costs of Education in the Ambulatory Setting: A Review of the Literature.  Acad Med. 2002;77(7):621-80.

3. Usatine RP, et al. Reactions of family medicine community preceptors to teaching medical students. Fam Med. 1995;27:566–70.

4. Dodson MC. Motivation and reward factors that affect private physician involvement in an obstetrics and gynecology clerkship. Obstet Gynecol. 1998;92(4 Pt 1):628–33.

5. Levy BT, Gjerde CL, Albrecht LA. The effects of precepting on and the support desired by community-based preceptors in Iowa. Acad Med. 1997;72:382–4.