Council on Medical Student Education in Pediatrics

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COMSEP Meeting in Nashville

Poster Presentation:


TEAM-BASED LEARNING IN PEDIATRIC CLERKSHIP PROMOTES SKILL ACQUISITION AND APPLICATION

Authors:

Lucy Chang, MD, MS, MD, MS, NYU School of  Medicine, New York, NY, Linda Tewksbury, MD, MS, NYU School of Medicine, New  York, NY


Background Team-based learning (TBL) is a well-defined instructional strategy that is increasingly employed in the clinical years.  Studies have shown that TBL in other core clerkships results in higher student engagement, satisfaction, and improved NBME subject examination scores.  However little has been published about TBL in pediatric clerkships, notably specific team-building skills acquired and applicability to clinical settings.
Objective To assess the impact of TBL in a pediatric clerkship on students’ team-building skills, ability to apply knowledge/skills to clinical settings, and overall educational experience.
Methods Four TBL modules focused on integrating basic sciences into core pediatric clinical topics have been incorporated into the pediatric clerkship since July 2011.  Students completed an anonymous evaluation on TBL at end of clerkship including self-assessed team-building skills, ability to apply knowledge/skills, and educational experience on a 5-point Likert scale (strongly disagree to strongly agree, or poor to outstanding).
Results 160/182 (87.9%) students completed TBL evaluations during period from Jan-Sept 2012 (six 6-week clerkship blocks).  The majority of students agreed or strongly agreed that TBL improved their team-building skills including conflict resolution (79.3%), speaking up in a team setting (80.8%), developing and articulating cohesive arguments (80.0%), and supporting team members (83.8%).  83.1% agreed or strongly agreed that skills they gained in TBL helped them apply pediatric knowledge to clinical care (48.1% agree, 35% strongly agree).  79.9% agreed or strongly agreed that skills they gained in TBL can be generalized to other clinical settings (58.8% agree, 21.1% strongly agree).  The overall educational experience for each module was rated as at least “very good” by > 86.9% of students with > 53.8% rating modules as excellent/outstanding.
Conclusion TBL is an effective instructional strategy in the pediatric clerkship.  Learners not only report that they improved their team-building skills but that knowledge and skills gained can be applied outside of TBL to clinical care and generalized to other clinical settings. Future studies using competency based assessments are needed to affirm these self-reported outcomes.