Council on Medical Student Education in Pediatrics

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COMSEP Meeting in Ottawa, ON

Poster Presentation:


COMPARING THE IMPACT OF AN ONLINE MODULE TO FACULTY FEEDBACK SESSIONS ON STUDENTS - ORAL PRESENTATIONS: A MULTI-CENTER RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL.

Authors:
Colin M. Sox,Boston University School of Medicine,Boston ,MA,Linda O. Lewin,University of Maryland School of Medicine,Baltimore,MD,Rebecca . Tenney-Soeiro,The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania & The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia PA,Philadelphia,PA,Jeanine Ronan,The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania & The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia,Philadelphia,PA,Mary Brown,Tufts University School of Medicine @Floating Hospital for Children,Boston,MA,Marta . King,St. Louis University School of Medicine,St. Louis,MO,Rachel Thompson,Boston University School of Medicine & Boston Medical Center,Boston,MA,Michelle B. Noelck,Oregon Health & Science University,Portland,OR,Jamie S. Sutherell,St. Louis University School of Medicine,St. Louis,MO,Mike Dell,Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine,Cleveland,,OH

Background: Faculty-led feedback sessions have been shown to improve pediatric clerkship students’ oral case presentations. The effectiveness of a self-directed web-based oral presentation module is unknown.

Objective: To compare the effectiveness of a self-directed, web-based CLIPP oral presentation module to faculty-led face-to-face feedback sessions in improving medical students’ oral case presentations during pediatric clerkships.

Methods: We are conducting a year-long single-blinded cluster randomized controlled trial among medical students rotating in third-year pediatric clerkships at seven U.S. medical schools. Blocks of students were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 study-arms: (1) CLIPP module, (2) Feedback, and (3) Control.  During the first two weeks of the clerkship, the CLIPP subjects were required to complete the on-line CLIPP presentation module, while small groups of Feedback subjects received feedback on their presentations from faculty; Control subjects did neither.  Two outcomes were evaluated during the last week of the clerkship: (I) the overall quality of students’ presentations assessed by faculty blinded to randomization status, and (II) student report of having received helpful guidance on presentations during the clerkship. We conducted multivariate (I) linear and (II) logistic regressions clustered on block and controlling for intervention status and school.

Results: So far, 665 students at 7 U.S. medical schools have participated in this study: 230 in the CLIPP group, 239 in the Feedback group, and 196 in the Control group. Compared to controls, oral presentation quality was significantly higher in the CLIPP (coefficient 0.42, 95% CI 0.18, 0.66) and Feedback groups (coefficient 0.35, 95% CI 0.10, 0.60). However, student perception of having received helpful guidance on presentations during the clerkship was not significantly associated with the CLIPP [odds ratio (OR): 0.65; 95% CI: 0.31, 1.35] or Feedback interventions compared to controls (OR:  0.80; 95% CI: 0.45, 1.40). There were no significant differences in either outcome when comparing the CLIPP and Feedback groups (both p-values = 0.54).

Conclusion: A self-directed web-based presentation module and faculty-led feedback sessions were similarly effective at improving the quality of students’ oral case presentations during pediatric clerkships.