Council on Medical Student Education in Pediatrics

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COMSEP Meeting in Nashville

Poster Presentation:


PEDIATRIC CLERKSHIP FEAR FACTOR: A SIMULATED CURRICULUM TARGETTING STUDENT PERFORMANCE ON FAMILY-CENTERED ROUNDS

Authors:

Raquel G. Hernandez, MD, MPH, MD, MPH, All  Children's Hospital, Johns Hopkins Medicine, St. Petersburg, FL, Brian Knox,  MD, MPH, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa,  Fl


Objective: Identify the effect of a family-centered simulated patient curriculum on medical student anxiety and performance.
Background: Family-centered rounds (FCR) are an important inpatient care construct that has improved patient satisfaction, clinical outcomes and hospital efficiency. Despite support for this care approach, students frequently report anxiety regarding performance on FCR. Use of a pragmatic yet innovative simulated curriculum that highlights key FCR aspects could promote student preparedness and optimal performance during FCR.
Methods:  We report a single-blinded randomized study of an FCR simulated curriculum for third-year clerkship students.  Students were randomized to receive our "fear factor" curriculum at the start of their clerkship which included a simulated FCR inpatient encounter. Students in the non-intervention group completed the standard pre-clerkship orientation. Our measurement outcomes include: 1) Student self-reported anxiety level (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, STAI) during FCR and 2)assessment of student performance using a modified Communication Assessment Tool (CAT). These outcomes are measured at baseline (T1), mid-point (T2) and at the end of the rotation (T3).  Descriptive statistics and regression analysis will identify trends in outcomes by study group.
Results: Our study will start November 1, 2012 with data collection ongoing until the end of the 2012-13 academic year. We will compare STAI anxiety scores and modified CAT scores of 3rd year medical students (n=100).  Additional results will relate to the resources needed for delivery of the curriculum.
Conclusion: Identifying methods by which student anxiety may be alleviated and performance improved during FCR is necessary. We expect that implementation of a simulated patient curriculum during the pediatric clerkship will be beneficial to students in both of these aspects.