Council on Medical Student Education in Pediatrics

COMSEP Logo

Search This Site

COMSEP 2009 Baltimore Meeting with APPD

Poster Presentation:


DOES A WEB-BASED ORAL PRESENTATION MODULE IMPROVE MEDICAL STUDENT ORAL PRESENTATION SKILLS: RESULTS FROM A PILOT RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

Authors:
Su-Ting T. Li, MD, MPH, UC Davis, Sacramento, CA, Daniel J. Tancredi, PhD, UC Davis, Sacramento, California, Stephanie N. Mateev, MD, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether a web-based oral presentation module improved medical student oral presentation skills compared to a written oral presentation guide. METHODS: A pilot randomized controlled trial of third-year pediatric medical students supported by a 2006 grant from COMSEP. After students consented, they were randomized to an interactive oral presentation website or a written oral presentation guide. Students were videotaped giving a 5-minute oral presentation based on a videotaped standardized patient interview and physical exam on orientation day (baseline) and on week 7 of the 8 week clerkship. Students randomized to the intervention were given access to the website after they had recorded their baseline oral presentation. We rated the students’ oral presentations with an oral presentation evaluation instrument we developed. Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability were determined using the Pearson product-moment correlation. Repeated measures regression models were used to assess and compare over-time gains in the two groups. RESULTS: 64 students consented to be enrolled in the study. Due to technical difficulties, 18 students’ first oral presentation was not recorded. 6 students did not record a second oral presentation, leaving a total of 40 students who recorded both oral presentations. The evaluation instrument’s inter-rater (0.89; 95% CI: 0.79-0.94) and intra-rater reliability (0.82; 95% CI: 0.75-0.90) were high. Students improved the overall quality of their oral presentation by 2.8 points (p=0.003) by the end of their pediatric clerkship. Students randomized to the website trended toward further improving the quality of their oral presentation by 2 points (p=0.14). A larger randomized controlled trial with 104 total students enrolled would have 80% power to detect a similar difference in effect size. CONCLUSIONS: A web-based oral presentation trainer has promise to improve the oral presentation skills of third-year medical students above that of an 8-week pediatric clerkship.